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"make something comparable" vs "make comparable something"

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What form is better style?

"to make something comparable"

-or-

"to make comparable something"

NN comments
donald remero
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As in, for example, “We should strive to make our quality comparable to that of brand X”? If so, I say J.D.’s answer below is correct.

markus
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Yes, I meant it as in the context you mentioned. Personally, I always use the first variant. I was asking because I came across the second variant and was not sure whether it is correct/good English.

donald remero
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I would not go so far as to say that it is “bad” English or that it is incorrect. It would certainly not be a conclusive indicator of non-native speech, for example. Depending on the context, such usage could be slightly awkward, yet at the same time effective for drawing attention to itself in a useful way. But, generally speaking the natural order of words is as J.D. indicates, direct object then indirect object.

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2 answers

3

j. d. o'conal [ Editor ]

Certainly 'to make something comparable' is better English, as it takes the form [ditransitive verb] [direct object] [indirect object]. However, I am not convinced that, given the context, these are the words I would choose.

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0

squiggle

I too would opt for the first if I had to chose between the two, though in many cases I would revise the sentence entirely. And I would always say 'comparable with' and never 'comparable to'.

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